BioViva treats first patient with gene therapy to reverse ageing

Some time ago I posted about BioViva, a new biotech company working on a cure for ageing led by Liz Parrish. In the video of the post, Liz appeared to be quite enthusiastic about what her company is doing and said that the company would hopefully have some results to show as soon as some point in 2016. Today, I stumbled upon an article on PrWeb, according to which “BioViva USA, Inc. has become the first company to treat a person with gene therapy to reverse biological aging, using a combination of two therapies developed and applied outside the United States of America. […] the subject is doing well and has resumed regular activities. Preliminary results will be evaluated at 5 and 8 months with full outcome expected at 12 months. The patient will then be monitored every year for 8 years […]. I suppose this is what Liz was talking about in the video, even though I haven’t find trace of the news on BioViva’s website (well, their site could use some work, I must say).

At any rate, I’m looking forward to hear again about this in a couple of months.

About SRF Summer Scholars and the Rejuvenation Biotechnology Conference

Although I’m a bit late in the game, I must definitely spend some words on the efforts that SENS Research Foundation puts into outreach and the education of young scientists—the very same ones that, hopefully soon enough, will play a crucial role in the development of the medical breakthroughs that are going to relegate ageing to history books.

SRF offers a summer scholars programme each year, giving undergraduate students the opportunity to work in the emerging, exciting field of regenerative medicine, and conduct research to tackle age-related diseases. As stated on the relevant webpage,

Under the guidance of a scientific mentor, each Summer Scholar conducts his or her own research project in such areas as tissue engineering, genetic engineering, and science policy. The Summer Scholars Program emphasizes development of not only laboratory skills but also communication skills as well. Students participating in the program hone their writing skills via periodic reports, which are designed to emulate text scientists commonly must produce. The program culminates with the students presenting the results of their summer research to scientists from other research institutions at a poster session at the Rejuvenation Biotechnology Conference at the end of the summer.

If you’re an undergraduate in a relevant field looking for a great opportunity to do cutting-edge research and kickstart your scientific career, I’m sure this would be a great chance and it would make an extremely fine addition to your CV. You can get an idea of the projects you could be working on, and the caliber of the scientists you’d be working with, by giving a look to the description page for the projects of this year. Unfortunately, it’s too late to join the programme of 2015, but there will certainly be others in years to come; if you’re interested, I recommend you to keep an eye on SRF’s Research Opportunities page to find out how to apply, what for and about the criteria for eligibility.

In the meantime, you can have a look at what this year’s students have to say about the programme in the video below; I would also like to remind you about the Rejuvenation Biotechnology Conferece 2015 (RB2015)—where the students eventually present their projects—held this year in San Francisco at the end of the summer. If you wish to attend as a member of the audience you can register here. They generally have big discounts if you register early enough, but as said I am late in the game and in fact the discount period ends today. Worst-case scenario, you’re prepared for next year 😛